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News
716 results total, viewing 21 - 40
Could President Donald Trump win Michigan a year from today? Or could anybody with a “D” after her or his name pound him by double digits? It depends on the poll and that’s down-right frustrating for everybody. more
Though we have so many neat things in this store, my favorite thing in the store is our front display. It is what you see on first entry of our establishment, and it is an ever-changing landscape just like the contents of our business. more
Lansing, like many cities across the nation, is beginning to embrace its riverfront in earnest. But there are holes in the picture. Perched above the park, in a prime spot on the river, sits the empty shell of the pole barn that housed Lansing’s dead City Market. more
On April 15, 1940, 21-year-old Irene Orkin was one of thousands of census workers across the United States who took part in conducting the decennial national count. Orkin knocked on James and Frances Lewis’ door at 816 S. Butler St. in Lansing and gathered information on everyone staying in the house. more
A new, $33 million redevelopment of the 1970 Lake Trust Credit Union building at the corner of Lenawee Street and Capitol Avenue could start to change all that, but the renovation, along with a new, five-story mixed-use building in the parking lot next door comes at a steep cost to taxpayers more
It just wasn’t going to feel like Christmas in downtown Lansing without those famous and festive red ornaments that have rested each Yuletide in the traffic circle on Michigan Avenue since 2009. more
Rotary Park has become a new focal point for downtown Lansing, a highlight of the River Trail that meanders along the east bank of the Grand River. But on the west bank of the Grand? An ugly Brutalist parking garage from 1968 rises from the water’s edge, blocking the public from strolling or even witnessing Lansing’s natural resource. more
When your favorite food disappears from the menu, what do you eat next? That’s the question Katie Kierczynski, a Michigan State University fisheries and wildlife graduate student, worked to answer by studying game fish diets in Lake Huron.  more
Recycling centers adapting to the loss of China as a market might take a look at what has been going on in Michigan’s Emmet County for decades. more
Michigan’s 3.9 million acres of state forests could be recruited for a fight to limit climate change by storing carbon emissions. more
Sometimes you have to fight invasive species with outside help. more
A newly proposed constitutional amendment would eliminate the age ceiling for Michigan judges, a move that would align the state’s judiciary with the federal system. more
Michigan is gearing up to count the youth and homeless populations that are key to its federal funding and representation. more
Abuse among the elderly – an increasing population in the state – is so widespread that state leaders have begun implementing a variety of solutions. more
People really don’t know how to take the baby. People don’t even know what to call our mascot. Some know what a Kewpie doll is, but most just call it the “creepy baby.” more
State Rep. Sarah Anthony, a Democrat who represents Lansing in the Capitol, has reaffirmed her support for Councilwoman Jody Washington in next week’s election after giving mixed messages.  more
This week’s Eye for Design can be found by trick-or-treaters in East Lansing, although we cannot guarantee that the inhabitants are participating in this hallowed tradition. more
I wondered what the final straw would look like, and more specifically, whether one would ever exist. In other words, what would it take for Republicans to decide that enough is enough — that there is a line and Trump has crossed it? more
We may never know the full story since Schlichting grants few interviews and even fewer when she doesn’t have control over the environment. But a review of her reputation as an unconventional leader and change-agent points to an almost unhappy arrangement from the start. more
Ingham County Clerk Barb Byrum said it took a while before doctors could tell her what was amiss with her younger son, Bryce. He’s articulate with no noticeable signs of a disability. But careful childhood screenings kept turning up red flags. “He had failed many hearing tests in preschool,” she said. more
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