City Pulse - Movies http://www.lansingcitypulse.com/lansing/articles.sec-253-1-movies.html <![CDATA[Fall forward]]> As the smoke clears on the summer movie season and the Hollywood studios reap their blockbuster earnings (or bemoan their losses), Studio C! in Okemos is making some room once again for the East Lansing Film Series.]]> <![CDATA[Reefer blandness]]> Some comedies demand repeat viewings to allow your brain to wrap around the complexity or the subtlety of the humor, or to soak in a boldly original acting performance. Admittedly, I was no fan of “The Big Lebowski,” “Best in Show” or “Zoolander” the first time I saw them, but I now rank them among my favorites.]]> <![CDATA[Appraising race]]> Between the recent George Zimmerman acquittal and that still-trending celebrity chef nastiness, we are reminded, yet again, that we do not live in anything close to a post-racist society. Apparently America can elect a black president, but it just can’t seem to shake 237 years of ingrained bigotry. Seriously … can we all get along?]]> <![CDATA[Backwoods royalty]]> In the magically surreal world of 'The Kings of Summer,' 15-year-old Joe Toy and a couple of his buddies build a functional two-story house out of found materials, 'Gilligan’s Island'-style, in the middle of a suburban Ohio patch of woods. Then they run away from home to live in it for a summer.]]> <![CDATA[Star pluckers]]> Last month, Slate.com reported that the NSA surveillance scandal inspired a 5,000 percent jump in online sales of the George Orwell novel “1984,” which depicts a ubiquitously monitoring dystopian state.]]> <![CDATA[Use your illusion]]> The 2006 dueling magician movie "The Prestige" laid out the three aspects of a magic trick: The pledge (introduction of a seemingly normal object), the turn (making something extraordinary happen to that object) and the prestige.]]> <![CDATA[Mississippi 'Mud']]> After an electrifying breakthrough performance in 1996's "A Time to Kill" — followed by solid showings in "Contact" and "Amistad" — Matthew McConaughey mostly slummed it through the '00s.]]> <![CDATA[Heavy metal]]> Since the superhero genre was reinvigorated in 2000 with the earnest "X-Men" flick, comic book movies have become, with a few exceptions, less laughable and more laugh-all-the-way-to-the-bankable — and attracting top-tier acting talent, to boot.]]> <![CDATA[League of extraordinary gentleman]]> The first time we see Jackie Robinson in the biopic "42," he's in silhouette, crouched like a tiger, leading off about 10 feet from first base at a Negro League night game. The pitcher winds up, throws one over the plate, and Robinson (Chadwick Boseman) breaks into a loping sprint.]]> <![CDATA[Capital City Film Festival brings the magic]]> Capital City Film Festival director Dominic Cochran calls the 55 submitted and curated films the festival’s "strongest line-up so far," opting to include a couple that have already been out for awhile.]]> <![CDATA[Requiem for a medium]]> <![CDATA[Capital City Film Festival Reviews]]> Reviews of "Andrew Bird: Fever Year," "Holy Motors," "Tchoupitoulas," "The Story of Luke" and "Only the Young."]]> <![CDATA[The kids are all Reich]]> Nazis are easy narrative villains — the systematic slaughter of 11 million people really puts them in their own class of evil. Consequently, in literature and film, it's a bold move to depict them as anything less than cold-blooded monsters.]]> <![CDATA[The Screening Room]]> In a perfect world, a visionary filmmaker such as Sam Raimi could make a prequel to "The Wizard of Oz" without having it compared to its 1939 predecessor, inarguably one of the greatest motion pictures ever made. Sure, we're in the middle of a spate of subpar big screen adaptations and "re-imaginings" of classic children's stories, but it's hardly fair to make Raimi pay for the sins of his peers. But films aren't made in a vacuum; every allusion has its price. ]]> <![CDATA[April in the C]]> Next week, the lights go down for the East Lansing Film Society Film Series' final month of programming before taking the summer off. So long, Werner Herzog; hey there, Iron Man — gotta give those blockbusters room to breathe.]]> <![CDATA[Catching fire]]> If it weren't a true story, it would seem like a cliché: The dead city handling its own cremation, one abandoned building at a time. For decades, Detroit has been slipping from obsolescence into an all-out hell on Earth. But according to the Detroit firefighter documentary "Burn," not everyone has given up on the decaying metropolis just yet.]]> <![CDATA[C! worthy]]> In its first two months, experimental film theater Studio C! in Okemos has already transformed the concept of a night at the movies for mid-Michigan filmgoers. It has food several notches above your typical megaplex fare (think appetizers, pizzas and sandwiches) as well as a liquor license and, for a modest upgrade price, lush reclining seats. Oh, and for the last month it’s shown a slew of award-winning films that were largely unavailable in Lansing.]]> <![CDATA[Between 'dear' and 'debacle']]> Life, obviously, doesn't come with an owner's manual, but if it did, the film "Amour" would certainly make for a good final chapter — call it "What to Expect when You’re Expiring." Unflinchingly frank in its discussion of mortality, dignity and, well, love, "Amour" should be required viewing for the human race.]]> <![CDATA[What a world ...]]> It's pretty much settled that humans are responsible for changing the world's climate. Unfortunately, we're submerged in the world of pop culture where loud-mouthed idiots like Rush Limbaugh dupe Americans into questioning the facts. It's sad that people even think climate change is still up for discussion.]]> <![CDATA[The Screening Room]]> Extraordinary real-life events can make for some great movies. Change a few names, insert a love interest, cut, print and call it a day. Take "Argo," for example — with its combination of political intrigue, Hollywood insider-ism and armchair-gripping suspense, it's a textbook case of a true story that goes great with a little butter and salt.]]>