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Wednesday, May 23,2012

Keeping what's left

Preservation Lansing awards shine a light on great old buildings and the people who love them

by Lawrence Cosentino
Just eight buildings (pictured above) and two districts have been designated as historic by Lansing. The Ottawa-Walnut Historic District consists of two double houses at 320-328 W. Ottawa Street, among the few remaining 19th-century town houses and apartments once common in Lansing.
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Wednesday, May 16,2012

One house, 100 stories

Potter House tour meanders through the halls of history

by Lawrence Cosentino
“There are some Catholics who won’t come inside because exorcisms were performed in the house,” he said with a grin. Potter House, one of the city’s biggest and most idiosyncratic homes, served a stint in the 1960s and 1970s as lavish crib for three successive heads of Lansing’s Roman Catholic diocese.
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Wednesday, May 16,2012

When Charlie met Igor

Pianist steals Lansing Symphony season finale

by Lawrence Cosentino
Big symphonies by titans like Mahler and Sibelius evoke a similar shiver in some listeners, no matter how good the orchestra — or the biscuits — are. To take Lansing’s symphony lovers for one last spin, Thursday’s season finale offered a dread-free symphonic trip: two ripping cruises, with civilization always in view, no storms over two minutes long and a party in every port.
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Wednesday, May 9,2012

Symphony meets storybook

Charlie Albright performs 'Fantasies & Fairy Tales'

by Lawrence Cosentino
With any luck, the 2010 Gilmore Young Artist won’t have to pack a stethoscope anytime soon. With his career still in its rosy dawn, Albright has combined dexterity, depth and dramatic insight to forge a strong, original style.
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Wednesday, May 2,2012

'I'm a non-fanatic'

Mark Grebner digs the details

by Lawrence Cosentino
While Lindemann has yoked his power as drain commissioner to a passionate crusade for low-impact development and cleaner water, Grebner wants to pull the plug and drain the drama from the office.
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Wednesday, May 2,2012

'I'm an artist'

Pat Lindemann paints the big picture

by Lawrence Cosentino
“The Great Lakes basin has 20 percent of the available water in the whole world,” Lindemann said. “This is a major responsibility.” He blinked, as if distracted from a telescope trained on the Andromeda galaxy by a rat scurrying across the observatory. “You can’t get here and try to manage that through name-calling, innuendoes, threats and all the other crap that a lot of politicians like to pull, including Grebner.”
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Wednesday, May 2,2012

Street life

'The Broad Without Walls' project installs art around East Lansing

by Lawrence Cosentino
Passersby curious enough to look into the crates saw hundreds of bundled black-and-white photographs, all portraits of people who met violent death under repressive Latin American regimes. Within 15 minutes, the van was gone. A woman wearing a blood-red scarf sat quietly among the crates, sewing squares of fabric over the faces in the photographs.
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Wednesday, April 25,2012

Stalin is dead — let's party

by Lawrence Cosentino
A double shot of piano concertos featuring piano god Ralph Votapek, the mighty rumble of Shostakovich Tenth Symphony, big choral works from Brahms and Monteverdi, the return of pianist Christopher O’Riley and a generous salvo of lesser-known music promises to make the 2012-2013 Lansing Symphony season a ride and a half.
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Wednesday, April 25,2012

A view from the ranks

by Lawrence Cosentino
All three drooled at the prospect of lending a hand Oct. 6 to the Shostakovich epic, one of the 20th century’s great musical canvases. “Every time you turn the page, it’s exciting,” Kroth said. “The slow movement is just poetry, with the flute, oboe and bassoon. It’s so beautiful.”
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Wednesday, April 25,2012

Sound and soundness

Symphony harmonizes Bach with the bottom line

by Lawrence Cosentino
By all indicators, from artistic to economic, the symphony has successfully made the transition from classical music’s marble-pedestal past to a new age of accessibility and budget consciousness.
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