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Wednesday, May 2,2012

Street life

'The Broad Without Walls' project installs art around East Lansing

by Lawrence Cosentino
Passersby curious enough to look into the crates saw hundreds of bundled black-and-white photographs, all portraits of people who met violent death under repressive Latin American regimes. Within 15 minutes, the van was gone. A woman wearing a blood-red scarf sat quietly among the crates, sewing squares of fabric over the faces in the photographs.
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Wednesday, April 25,2012

Stalin is dead — let's party

by Lawrence Cosentino
A double shot of piano concertos featuring piano god Ralph Votapek, the mighty rumble of Shostakovich Tenth Symphony, big choral works from Brahms and Monteverdi, the return of pianist Christopher O’Riley and a generous salvo of lesser-known music promises to make the 2012-2013 Lansing Symphony season a ride and a half.
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Wednesday, April 25,2012

A view from the ranks

by Lawrence Cosentino
All three drooled at the prospect of lending a hand Oct. 6 to the Shostakovich epic, one of the 20th century’s great musical canvases. “Every time you turn the page, it’s exciting,” Kroth said. “The slow movement is just poetry, with the flute, oboe and bassoon. It’s so beautiful.”
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Wednesday, April 25,2012

Sound and soundness

Symphony harmonizes Bach with the bottom line

by Lawrence Cosentino
By all indicators, from artistic to economic, the symphony has successfully made the transition from classical music’s marble-pedestal past to a new age of accessibility and budget consciousness.
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Wednesday, April 25,2012

Zeroing in: Chamber series

by Lawrence Cosentino
The final Lansing Symphony chamber concert of the season gave delicate notice that the symphony isn’t all about blasting brass, soaring strings and booming tympani.
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Wednesday, April 18,2012

John Schneider's good streak

How Lansing's workaday knight took the city to heart

by Lawrence Cosentino
He could have pushed a mailbag or worked on an assembly line all those years, and nearly did. Instead, he combined the daily-grind work ethic of his Detroit roots with the knightly passion of the Watergateera journalism he absorbed in the early 1970s..
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Wednesday, April 18,2012

Fiddler on the podium

Joshua Bell becomes conductor of Academy of St. Martin in the Fields

by Lawrence Cosentino
There hasn’t been a player-manager in baseball since Pete Rose in the 1980s, but the breed is far from extinct. Classical violinist Joshua Bell, already destined for the Fiddle Hall of Fame, will both solo with and conduct the fabled Academy of St. Martin in the Fields in a meaty all-Beethoven program at the Wharton Center Saturday.
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Wednesday, April 18,2012

Art farmers

Broad Museum infiltrates the soil with the launch of 'The Land Grant'

by Lawrence Cosentino
The culture shock of the ultramodern Eli and Edythe Broad Museum springing up at agricultural-rooted Michigan State University has already been compared to a spaceship landing in a cornfield. Little did we know the infiltration would start from the grass roots.
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Wednesday, April 11,2012

Beating the bushes

After seasonal cutbacks, city looks for help at Cooley Gardens

by Lawrence Cosentino
Unlike the downtown cubicle refugees who steal an hour of sanity in Cooley’s cool pines and flowerbeds, Lansing’s parks and recreation director was still working. In suit and tie, he started pulling weeds, picking up trash and tugging at storm-downed branches.
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Wednesday, April 11,2012

Two coups — beaucoup cool

Jazz legend Sonny Rollins and opera star Renee Fleming top Wharton Center's jazz and classics lineup in the new season

by Lawrence Cosentino
In the jazz world, it just doesn’t get any better than Rollins, one the most enduring and accomplished musicians America has produced. His career stretches back to historic stints with Miles Davis and Thelonious Monk in the 1950s, followed by influential piano-less trio work that opened the tenor sax to wider realms of expression.
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