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Wednesday, June 13,2012

Down-they-go Abbey?

College puts three century-old houses up for auction; preservationist says it's an 'empty gesture'

by Lawrence Cosentino
Despite a flurry of objections from local preservationists, Lansing Community College is sticking to its plans to replace three century-old downtown houses at the southwest corner of North Capitol Avenue and Saginaw Street with a welcome area welcome sign.
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Wednesday, June 13,2012

Two for the Books

Gay Okemos couple shares a lifetime of collecting with MSU and the community

by Lawrence Cosentino
Mark Ritzenhein and Stephen Wilensky love to recall the afternoon in the early 1990s when they crossed the Yarlung River in a wooden boat, heading into Tibet, listening to the clicking of unsoftened yak cheese.
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Wednesday, June 6,2012

LCC's wrecking ball to strike again

Three houses from the 19th and early 20th century are to come down for a green space with signs. One was the home of department store owner F.N. Arbaugh. City official surprised.

by Lawrence Cosentino
"The fact of this building coming down upsets me more than us losing our office," Bonnie Faraone, wife of attorney Michael Faraone, told the group. The Faraones have kept their law office at 617 N. Capitol, built in 1888, for eight years. "We're just a person who's going to pass through time, like everyone else," Faraone said. "This thing has survived 124 years."
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Wednesday, May 23,2012

Subduing a hulk

Old Town's Walker Building goes from green to serene

by Lawrence Cosentino
The recent life of Old Town’s historic Walker Building has been a lot like the Hulk’s, only in reverse. When it was big and green, nobody noticed it. Now that it’s settled down and dressed in earth tones, it’s turning heads.
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Wednesday, May 23,2012

Keeping what's left

Preservation Lansing awards shine a light on great old buildings and the people who love them

by Lawrence Cosentino
Just eight buildings (pictured above) and two districts have been designated as historic by Lansing. The Ottawa-Walnut Historic District consists of two double houses at 320-328 W. Ottawa Street, among the few remaining 19th-century town houses and apartments once common in Lansing.
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Wednesday, May 16,2012

One house, 100 stories

Potter House tour meanders through the halls of history

by Lawrence Cosentino
“There are some Catholics who won’t come inside because exorcisms were performed in the house,” he said with a grin. Potter House, one of the city’s biggest and most idiosyncratic homes, served a stint in the 1960s and 1970s as lavish crib for three successive heads of Lansing’s Roman Catholic diocese.
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Wednesday, May 16,2012

When Charlie met Igor

Pianist steals Lansing Symphony season finale

by Lawrence Cosentino
Big symphonies by titans like Mahler and Sibelius evoke a similar shiver in some listeners, no matter how good the orchestra — or the biscuits — are. To take Lansing’s symphony lovers for one last spin, Thursday’s season finale offered a dread-free symphonic trip: two ripping cruises, with civilization always in view, no storms over two minutes long and a party in every port.
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Wednesday, May 9,2012

Symphony meets storybook

Charlie Albright performs 'Fantasies & Fairy Tales'

by Lawrence Cosentino
With any luck, the 2010 Gilmore Young Artist won’t have to pack a stethoscope anytime soon. With his career still in its rosy dawn, Albright has combined dexterity, depth and dramatic insight to forge a strong, original style.
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Wednesday, May 2,2012

'I'm a non-fanatic'

Mark Grebner digs the details

by Lawrence Cosentino
While Lindemann has yoked his power as drain commissioner to a passionate crusade for low-impact development and cleaner water, Grebner wants to pull the plug and drain the drama from the office.
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Wednesday, May 2,2012

'I'm an artist'

Pat Lindemann paints the big picture

by Lawrence Cosentino
“The Great Lakes basin has 20 percent of the available water in the whole world,” Lindemann said. “This is a major responsibility.” He blinked, as if distracted from a telescope trained on the Andromeda galaxy by a rat scurrying across the observatory. “You can’t get here and try to manage that through name-calling, innuendoes, threats and all the other crap that a lot of politicians like to pull, including Grebner.”
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