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Wednesday, May 9,2012

'American Life' comes alive

You'll get to see what you've been missing when Ira Glass’ popular radio series makes its way to theaters Thursday

by Tracy Key
On Thursday night, over 500 movie theaters in the United States and Canada will be showing more than just current Hollywood hits. “This American Life,” the most popular podcast in the country, will perform an episode of its show live on stage in New York City, bursting onto the big screen via satellite to give viewers what host and executive producer Ira Glass describes as a “multimedia adventure.”
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Wednesday, May 2,2012

Street life

'The Broad Without Walls' project installs art around East Lansing

by Lawrence Cosentino
Passersby curious enough to look into the crates saw hundreds of bundled black-and-white photographs, all portraits of people who met violent death under repressive Latin American regimes. Within 15 minutes, the van was gone. A woman wearing a blood-red scarf sat quietly among the crates, sewing squares of fabric over the faces in the photographs.
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Wednesday, May 2,2012

Advice Goddess

Baby makes flee & cheatapalooza

by Amy Alkon
Q: When I married five years ago, I was on the fence about having kids. I thought some parental gene might kick in, but it never did. Now, at 40, I’ve accepted that a childless marriage is best for us, given my wife’s fertility issues and my ambivalence about parenthood. My wife, however, sees no purpose to life without children. It upsets her to see me happy without kids while she pines for them. She is also upset that I won´t try all possible alternatives, such as adoption and fertility treatments, and is generally angry and outright hostile toward me.
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Wednesday, May 2,2012

Home run

Jim Abbott writes about his baseball career and his parents' love story

by Bill Castanier
Abbott’s emergence from Flint was a storybook tale, especially considering that he was born without a right hand. On a scholarship to the University of Michigan, he collected two Big 10 championships, a solid 26-8 record and won the Sullivan Award for the best college athlete in 1987, the first baseball player to win the award. He then became a member of the triumphant U.S. Olympic Baseball Team, which won an unofficial Gold Medal in the 1988 Olympics (baseball was classified as a demonstration sport that year).
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Wednesday, May 2,2012

Power, not preachiness

Beauty and brutality collide in fine 'Ruined'

by Paul Wozniak
In the Democratic Republic of Congo, Mama Nadi’s brothel bustles with soldiers from both sides of the omnipresent, unnamed conflict. Patrons respect Mama’s authority under her roof, leaving their bullets at the door, despite the brutal anarchy outside. But Mama can only remain neutral for so long until she joins the tide or risks being swept away.
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Wednesday, May 2,2012

Strum away on Saturday

Find your inner Hawaiian during Mighty Uke Day

by Rich Tupica
Back in 1938, musician Andy Cummings was nearing the end of a long tour with the Paradise Islands Revue when he arrived in Lansing on an icy winter day. After his performance, the temperature had dropped to 5 degrees. Cummings walked back to his hotel and began to reminisce about the crashing waves and sandy white beaches of Hawaii.
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Wednesday, May 2,2012

Taking comics seriously

Capital City Collectibles hosts Free Comic Book Day

by Rich Tupica
Jahner owned Capital City Collectibles for three decades until he passed away on Sept. 22, 2010, at the age of 55. Jahner’s love for rarities kept the store packed with thousands of comics, action figures, books, memorabilia, films and more.
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Wednesday, May 2,2012

Turn it down

by Rich Tupica
Whether The Features are opening shows for their pals in Kings of Leon, taking the stage at Bonnaroo or going on an indie DIY tour, the Nashville-based band hasn’t slowed down since it formed in 1994. Fans of the Manchester Orchestra may dig the band’s indie-pop-rock sound. On May 9, the band stops at Mac’s Bar. Opening the gig is local rockers The Hat Madder. The Features’ latest LP, “Wilderness,” includes tunes like “Another One” and “Fats Domino,” showcasing the band’s ability to mix pop ingenuity with vivid lyrics, catchy hooks, and experimental soul. “I feel like we walk this fine line,” said singer/guitarist Matt Pelham. “We’re not weird enough for a certain crowd and we’re a little bit too out there for the other crowd.” Nevertheless, the band caught the attention of the members of Kings of Leon; they signed The Features to its own label, Serpents & Snakes, back in 2009.
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Wednesday, May 2,2012

A famously fractured friendship

Celebrated scientists square off in Riverwalk Theatre’s 'Copenhagen'

by Alyssa Firth
Imagine Niels Bohr, the famous Danish physicist who was a part of the Manhattan Project, and Werner Heisenberg, famous for the uncertainty theory, coming back from the dead, in someplace between “heaven and an atom,” to discuss what happened on that fateful day in 1941 when the two met in Copenhagen and had a falling out that ultimately destroyed their friendship
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Wednesday, May 2,2012

A new spin on 'Cinderella'

Children's Ballet Theatre revises a classic fairy tale

by Alyssa Firth
Although an auditorium full of children may not sound like everyone’s dream come true, it's exactly what Children's Ballet Theatre board chairwoman Caryn Rhodes likes to see. "They're a very appreciative audience," Rhodes said, and that’s exactly what she wants for her production of “Cinderella.”
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