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Wednesday, March 12,2014

Out On the Town

by City Pulse Staff

WEDNESDAY 12 >> iAN&ANi

Russian-born cellist Ian Maksin earned his classical chops from Mstislav Rostropovich, and he has played with the likes of Sting, Snoop Dogg, P. Diddy and Andrea Bocelli. (Now there's a dinner party.) In 2011 he joined with Bulgarian pianist Ani Gogova to form the duo iAN&ANi, playing an eclectic mix of music to critical acclaim, earning them a slot on NPR’s “Worldview” and selling out the Chopin Theatre in Chicago. The duo comes to Lansing's with a scorching tango set featuring music of Astor Piazzolla, Alberto Ginastera, Manuel De Falla, Gaspar Cassado, Maurice Ravel, and Rodion Shchedrin. 7:30 p.m. First Presbyterian Church, 510 W. Ottawa St., Lansing. $7-15. For more information call (517) 482-0668.

THURSDAY-SUNDAY, MARCH 13-16 >> ‘A SHOT IN THE DARK’ AT RIVERWALK THEATRE

Parlor maid Josefa Lantenay is found naked and unconscious at the scene of her lover’s murder. Investigating this crime is Paul Sevigne (Evan Pinnsonault), an Inspector Clouseau-like detective on the French police force. Confessions, denials and doe-eyes from Lantenay has Sevigne feeling like he’s on a spinning merry-go-round. While he works on the case, you’ll keep busy trying to figure out who’s sleeping with whom, which is a mini-mystery in itself. $9-15. Riverwalk Theatre, 228 Museum Drive, Lansing. (517) 482-5700, riverwalktheatre.com. (Run continues March 20-23)

SUNDAY, MARCH 16 >> ‘THE FANTASTICKS’ AT CHARLOTTE PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

“The Fantasticks” is the world's longest running musical — the show's original off- Broadway production ran for 42 years and 17,162 performances — but that doesn’t mean it’s stuck in the past. In the final show of Charlotte Performing Arts Center’s 10th anniversary season gives “The Fantasticks” a retro-futuristic tweak by going steampunk. When two meddling fathers try to get their children to fall in love with each other by pretending to feud, their temporary success goes awry when their kids catch wise to the plot. What seems like a straightforward farce gets twisty with a pair of fantasy dream sequences as each grows increasingly disillusioned. 2 p.m. $35/$10 students. Charlotte Performing Arts Center, 378 State St., Charlotte. (517) 541-5691, cpacpresents.com.

FRIDAY-SATURDAY, MARCH 14-15 >> ‘DYLAN’ BY LCC PERFORMING ARTS DEPARTMENT

Years before a certain American wordsmith named Dylan stole the folk hero spotlight there was another Dylan (first name, this time) who left his indelible mark on the world of poetry. Lansing Community College presents “Dylan,” the story of Dylan Thomas, which delves into Welsh poet’s struggles with his craft and with alcoholism. Though laden with tragedy, “Dylan,” directed by John Lennox (who played the titular role at Western Michigan University in 1987), blends humor and romance, exploring Thomas’ many complexities, including his conflicted marriage to his wife Caitlin. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, March 14-15 (continues Friday-Saturday, March 21-22). $10/$5 students and faculty. LCC Black Box Theatre, Room. 168 Gannon Building, 411 N. Grand Ave., Lansing. (517) 483-1488, lcc.edu/showinfo.

SUNDAY, MARCH 16 >> TAO: PHOENIX RISING

Be awed by the costumes, choreography and energy that is TAO: Phoenix Rising. Intensely trained in the mountains of Japan, the performers combine tradition with modernism in a fusion of precision, power and stamina that present a unique take on customary Japanese drumming. Before the performance, Wharton will host an Insight Preview for audience members to learn about the performance from experts. 3 p.m. $15-$35. Cobb Great Hall, 750 W. Shaw Lane, East Lansing. (800) WHARTON, whartoncenter.com.

TUESDAY-SUNDAY, MARCH 18-23 >> ‘THE SERPENT LADY’ AT MSU AUDITORIUM

Marriage vows often close with the promise to remain faithful, “in sickness and in health, until death do us part.” However, do the rules change when your beloved turns into a snake? Cherestani transforms into a slithering, split-tongued reptile to test Farruscad’s devotion to her, which he struggles with. Will Farruscad receive a peck or a bite by the end of this fairytale? This is a commedia dell’arte fairy tale, which means the actors wear masks and use puppetry and physical comedy to tell the story. 7:30 p.m. Tuesday-Thursday; 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday; 2 p.m. Satuday-Sunday. Post-show discussion on Thursday, March 20; pre-show discussion at 1:15 p.m. on Sunday, March 23. Studio 60 Theatre, MSU Auditorium, 542 Auditorium Road, East Lansing. (800) WHARTON, whartoncenter.com.

FRIDAY, MARCH 14 >> ‘CRYPSIS’

The student film “Crypsis” was shot on location at MSU’s Broad Art Museum. It’s a noir-inspired transfiguration of H.G Wells’ novel, “The Invisible Man.” Jack Griffin, an exiled scientist is seeking vengeance, but he’s not the only one on the hunt. Join the filmmakers for a Q&A to follow. 7:30 p.m. FREE. Broad Art Museum, 547 E. Circle Drive, East Lansing. broadmuseum.msu.edu, badtripfilms.com.

SATURDAY, MARCH 15 >> THE STUART HALL PROJECT

Cultural theorist Stuart Hall, who died last month at 82, created the school of thought known as British cultural studies, a theoretical approach of how media messages are produced, disseminated and interpreted. Hall had a major influence on media studies, including formulating the encoding/decoding model of communication that theorized mass media messages, specifically in television. These are interpreted differently by people based on their individual backgrounds. Filmmaker John Akomfrah charts Hall’s influential body of work in the movie “The Stuart Hall Project”; this screening is part of the Black Film as Social Activism series and will be followed by a discussion. 7:30 p.m. FREE. Broad Art Museum, 547 E. Circle Drive, East Lansing. broadmuseum.msu.edu.

TUESDAY-SUNDAY, MARCH 18-23 >> ‘PORGY AND BESS’ AT WHARTON CENTER

You can get a much-needed taste of “Summertime” at the award-winning Broadway tour of “The Gershwins’ Porgy and Bess,” coming to the Wharton Center for a six-day run. This iconic American folk opera, based of the novel by DuBose Heyward and featuring the music of George and Ira Gershwin, tells the story of the denizens of Charleston’s fictitious Catfish Row. Porgy, a crippled street beggar, tries to rescue the beautiful Bess from the clutches of her violent lover. This acclaimed show also features the songs “It Ain’t Necessarily So” and “I Got Plenty of Nuttin.’” 7:30 p.m. Tuesday-Thursday; 8 p.m. Friday- Saturday; 2 p.m. Saturday; 1 p.m. & 6:30 p.m. Sunday. $37-$72/$25 students. Wharton Center Cobb Great Hall, 750 W. Shaw Lane, East Lansing. (517) 432-2000, whartoncenter.com.

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