Header-lansing_1.jpg
 
Home News  Sympathizers and naysayers
. . . . . .
Wednesday, October 12,2011

Sympathizers and naysayers

by Andy Balaskovitz

 


“I think we’ve got to keep the momentum going because it’s impossible to translate the issue of the greed of Wall Street into one demand, or two demands. We’re talking about a democratic awakening. We’re talking about raising political consciousness, so it spills over; all parts of the country so people can begin to see what’s going on through a different set of lens. … It’s a democratic process, it’s a non-violent process, but it is a revolution, because these oligarchs have been transferring wealth from poor and working people at a very intense rate in the last 30 years, and getting away with it, and then still smiling in our faces and telling us it’s our fault. That’s a lie, and this beautiful group is a testimony to that being a lie.” Cornel West, American author, professor and activist Sept. 29 interview with DemocracyNow.org







“The protest movement that started in New York’s financial district several weeks ago with a couple hundred enthusiastic and unfocused shouters has grown to a few thousand, and now is vowing to take its show on the road. “They’re expected in Detroit near month’s end. “Occupy Wall Street’s main objective, from what I can make out from the inchoate signage, is the destruction of capitalism (a goal to which Obama can relate), although on a whim they can switch to global warming, medical marijuana or any number of other pet causes dear to the disaffected Left. … “It’s odd that such a small and predictable group could grab the president’s attention.”


Nolan Finley, editorial page editor, Detroit Free Press Oct. 9 column, “Can’t wait for Occupy Detroit”






“Anyone with eyes open knows that the gangsterism of Wall Street — financial institutions generally — has caused severe damage to the people of the United States (and the world). And should also know that it has been doing so increasingly for over 30 years, as their power in the economy has radically increased, and with it their political power. That has set in motion a vicious cycle that has concentrated immense wealth, and with it political power, in a tiny sector of the population, a fraction of 1%, while the rest increasingly become what is sometimes called ‘a precariat’ — seeking to survive in a precarious existence. They also carry out these ugly activities with almost complete impunity — not only too big to fail, but also ‘too big to jail.’ “The courageous and honorable protests underway in Wall Street should serve to bring this calamity to public attention, and to lead to dedicated efforts to overcome it and set the society on a more healthy course.”


Noam Chomsky, professor of linguistics and philosophy at Massachusetts Institute of Technology Posted on www.occupywallst.org, Sept. 29








“Don’t blame Wall Street, don’t blame the big banks, if you don’t have a job and you’re not rich, blame yourself! It is not a person’s fault because they succeeded, it is a person’s fault if they failed. And so this is why I don’t understand these demonstrations and what is it that they’re looking for.”


Herman Cain, Republican presidential candidate and former CEO of Grandfather’s Pizza Oct. 5 story on ABCNews.com







“For too long, Wall Street has been occupying the offices of our government, and the cloakrooms of our legislatures. They’ve been a constant presence, rewarded not with pepper spray in the face but with yet more loopholes and tax breaks and subsidies and contracts. You could even say Wall Street’s been occupying our atmosphere, since any attempt to do anything about climate change always run afoul of the biggest corporations on the planet. So it’s a damned good thing the tables have turned.”


Bill McKibben, American author and founder of 350.org, an organization dedicated to climate change awareness Oct. 7 e-mail to supporters posted on 350.org



Share
 
 


  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
 
 
: Please Configure.
 
Search Archive
Search Archive:
 
 

© 2014 City Pulse

City Pulse. 2001 E. Michigan Ave. Lansing, MI 48912.
Phone: (517)371-5600. Fax: (517) 999-6066.
E-mail: publisher@lansingcitypulse.com

 
Close