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Home Arts and Culture  Turn it Down: A survey of Lansing's musical landscape
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Wednesday, August 3,2011

Turn it Down: A survey of Lansing's musical landscape

by Rich Tupica

Edgy bluegrass, rockabilly at Mac’s


Cletus Got Shot has been bridging the gap
between folk protest songs and punk rock since the band formed in 2007.
The Fayetteville, Ark.-based trio has performed hundreds of shows
across the Midwest, playing songs blending edgy bluegrass, gospel,
country, folk and even some classic union-organizing songs. In keeping
with the band’s unconventional nature, the band’s bassist uses a
homemade bass made out of a gas tank.


The band plays Mac’s Bar Saturday.
Opening the show is a roster of locals, including The Devil’s Cut
(folk/bluegrass), and Chaz Brackx & the Tight Teens (rockabilly).
Also performing is the Klaw Mark Kittens, a local “burlesque wrestling”
troupe that features women wrestling in vintage lingerie — as in the
risqué 1950s films by Irving Klaw.


Another highlight of the night is the
Rock N Rummage sale, which will be happening throughout the night. The
in-bar rummage sale includes clothing, vinyl records, nostalgic items
and more. 


Saturday, Aug. 6 @ Mac’s Bar, 2700 E. Michigan Ave., Lansing, 18 and over. $5, 9 p.m.


A binary hip-hop star at The Loft


One Be Lo (a.k.a. One Man Army) has been a
Michigan hip-hop fixture since he first started getting noticed for his
storytelling rhymes back in 1998; that was when he co-founded the rap
duo Binary Star.


This Saturday he performs a record
release show for the mixtape “Laborhood Part 1” at The Loft. Born Raland
Scruggs in Pontiac, he would later change his name to Nahshid Sulaiman
after he embraced the teachings of Islam.


While the bulk of his songs has been
released on his own label, Subterraneous Records, his socially conscious
lyrics landed him a deal with Fat Beats Records in 2005, which released
his “S.O.N.O.G.R.A.M.” album.  


Opening the show are Lansing hip-hop artists Philthy, J-Young the General and Fowl.   


Saturday, Aug. 6 @ The Loft, 414 E. Michigan Ave., $7 advance, $8 day of show, doors 9 p.m.



Black Mass Sunday features goth, industrial music


Black Mass Sunday at Mac’s Bar is a new
and dark edition to the underground music scene in Lansing. Jay Fellows,
an organizer of the weekly event (held each Sunday), said the night is
dedicated to various under-the-radar genres.


“In addition to traditional Goth,
industrial, Batcave music — particularly from the late ‘70s and ‘80s —
we are exposing people to genres they may not be as familiar with in
Lansing,” Fellows explained. “Genres such as witch house, minimal synth,
coldwave, post-punk and grave wave.


“We are planning some upcoming live acts
that would likely be unlike anything Lansing has seen but may be more
familiar to Detroit and other larger cities. We’re really working to put
Lansing on the map and bring back stylish music with a dark aesthetic.”


The Sunday show features Kaustikutt (from Ann Arbor) and resident DJs Ein Sof Goyle (Fellows), MindControlFreak and Craves Case.


Kaustikutt (a.k.a. Nikolas Vudu) is a
self-described “sound-attack machine.” He’s influenced by old-school
industrial and electric body music acts like Skinny Puppy, Coil, and
Klinik, as well as post-punk and death-rock. Kaustikutt’s music has a
post-industrial, corrosive sound. The lyrics are often political,
covering topics of censorship, animal rights, the “(in)justice” system
and war.


Sunday, Aug. 7 @ Mac’s Bar, 2700 E.
Michigan Ave., Lansing, 18 and over. $3 cover after 10 p.m. (free
before 10 p.m.). Show runs from 9 p.m. to 2 a.m.



Summer Concerts in the Park series continues


Lansing Parks & Recreation presents
local blues-rock veterans Frog & the Beeftones Aug. 10 at the
Southside Community Center. The free Summer Concerts in the Park series
is hosted at various parks across the city on Wednesday nights. For more
information, visit www.lansingmi.gov/parks, or call (517) 483-6019. 


Wednesday, Aug. 10 @ Southside Community Center, 5815 Wise Road, Lansing, all ages, FREE, 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.



Great Lakes Folk Fest is approaching 


Hosted by the Michigan State University
Museum; the Great Lakes Folk Festival draws thousands of people to
downtown East Lansing to enjoy nearly 100 performers. The fest showcases
music, dance, food, story tellers, crafts people, a community sing and
more.


The three-day outdoor fest runs Aug.
12-14. There are four performance stages (including one with a
2,400-square-foot dance floor), children’s hands-on activities, crafts
demonstrations and a “green arts” marketplace. The fest is also
meant to promote cross-cultural understanding through many forms of
expression. 


This year’s fest includes many returning
acts who performed at past fests. Performers will include Johnnie
Bassett (Detroit blues), Cats & The Fiddler (bluegrass), Calvin
Cooke (sacred steel guitar/gospel), Nadim Dlaikan (Arab-American nay),
Feufollet, (Cajun), Gao Hong (Chinese pipa), Elizabeth LaPrelle,
(old-time ballads), Dudley and Jacqueline Laufman (New England
traditional barn dance) and Téada (Irish Celtic). For a complete list,
visit www.greatlakesfolkfest.net


Friday, Aug. 12- Sunday, Aug. 14 @
Downtown East Lansing, FREE (donations appreciated), visit
greatlakesfolkfestival2011.sched.org for times


If your band has an upcoming show, post it at www.facebook.com/turnitdown

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