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Friday, August 28,2009

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Yoga and Woodstock


I loved your coverage of Woodstock and found the picture on the front cover painfully true, showing how old the Woodstock generation has gotten. One piece that you missed mentioning was how the festival was opened.

Since the organizers were worried about the size of crowd, Swami Satchidananda, guru to the Woodstock generation, was invited to give the opening. He, like so many others, was stuck in traffic and the staff ended up helicoptering him in. He opened that peaceful festival with three “oms” and told the crowd to be peaceful since the world was watching them.


Peter Max brought Satchidananda to the U.S. and among his devotees was Carol King. At the time of Woodstock, his yoga center was in New York City. Later, King donated land in Virginia so he could establish "Yogaville.” That is where the main Ashram is today, although the New York center is still going strong. Ironically, Satchidananda died seven years ago almost right on the same day as his Woodstock appearance.


Maryann Concannon — Okemos




Distracted driving illegal


I enjoyed the article about cell phone use and driving a car. But if you look up Michigan law, you will find that it is illegal for a person in operation of a motor vehicle to be distracted. This was written long before cell phones.

We do not need new laws, we need the old ones to be enforced. This could cover loud music coming from a car, to many teenagers in a car, to the things people hang from rear view mirrors and the laptops police use in the cars.


— Brad Bethea Holt




Health care multi-faceted issue


Where are we going with health care? Will people really be better off health-wise if they are insured, or will it still boil down to those who take care of themselves and those who don’t?


Here are two cases of women who found lumps in their breasts, and either out of fear or lack of funds addressed the issue on their own.


One woman was smart enough to assess her lifestyle, and made drastic changes. She didn’t have money for vitamins or organic food, but instead got rid of all the junk food and lived a very pure, clean life. She walked everyday, did yoga, and made herself a tape with all kinds of healing, tender-loving music and positive affirmations. She put all of this into a rigorous program, and voila, it worked! She could not have seen a doctor because of a lack of funds, but he may not have had the time to tune in to her individual needs in getting through such a difficult disease.

Another lady found a lump on her breast and discovered a system called Silva Mind Control, which helped her gain control of her mind and her thoughts. This is what she attributes to her healing. When you go on a system like this, not only do you feel your own power, you work to increase your power.

The established profession needs to take steps toward broadening their horizons on curing so many of these diseases, and getting in touch with what people truly need in order to get well. The tension between the holistic camp and mainstream medicine must be lessened in order for patients to really benefit from the best of both perspectives.

The important thing is to train people on how to take care of themselves, and how to know the difference between needing to go to the doctor or taking care of a matter on their own. One essential thing to do on your own is look at your medicine intake and learn what each medication does and its side effects on your body and with other drugs.

This is a multi-faceted issue. President Barack Obama said that he would not make the same mistake of failing to pull all the citizens of this country together to analyze their own skills and strengths. It is citizen involvement on all fronts that will positively revolutionize the health care scene.


— Marlaina Kreinin East Lansing

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